August 7, 2020

SMART EATING, ACTIVE LIVING

WHAT ARE NUTRITION

Smart Eating: Pleasure, Too!

Why do you choose one food over another? Besides the nutrition benefits, food (smart eating) is a source of pleasure, adventure, and great taste! It’s no surprise that people entertain and celebrate with food, or look forward to a special dish.

Your own food choices reflect you and what’s important to you: your culture, your surroundings, the people around you, your view of yourself, the foods available to you, your emotions, and certainly what you know about food and nutrition. To eat for health, you don’t need to give up your food favorites. Simply learn how to fit them in. Good nutrition adds pleasure to eating especially as you eat a greater variety of vegetables,  fruits, whole-grain foods, and other nutrient-rich foods.

Smart Eating, Active Living:

Healthful eating and active living: they’re among your best personal investments! While your genes, age, surroundings, lifestyle, health care, and culture strongly influence your health, what and how much you eat and how much you move are key to your fitness equation.

What’s the secret? It’s no secret at all, just solid advice. In a nutshell, most people need to eat fewer calories, be more active, and make wiser food choices.

 

Enough, but Not Too Much!

Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs

It’s common knowledge: many Americans fall short on their nutrition report cards!

Many consume more calories than they need and too much-saturated fat, trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars, and salt. On the flip side, both kids and adults often shortchange themselves on calcium, potassium,
fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E. Many adults don’t consume enough vitamins A (as carotenoids) and C, either. And others, too little vitamin B12, folate, vitamin D, and iron.

WHAT ARE NUTRITION

To improve one’s nutrient profile, the Dietary Guidelines advise:

  1. Eat a variety of nutrient-dense foods and beverages within and among the food groups (including more dark-green vegetables, orange vegetables, legumes, fruits, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products)
  2. Limit foods with saturated fat, trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars, salt, and alcohol. Two tools can help you do that: MyPyra-mid from USDA and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan. Both focus on what to eat and how much.

To improve one’s nutrient profile, the Dietary Guidelines advise: (1) eat a variety of nutrient-dense foods and beverages within and among the food groups (including more dark-green vegetables, orange vegetables, legumes, fruits, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products) and (2) limit foods with saturated fat, trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars, salt, and alcohol. Two tools can help you do that: MyPyra-mid from USDA and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan. Both focus on what to eat—and how much.

To improve one’s nutrient profile, the Dietary Guidelines advise: (1) eat a variety of nutrient-dense foods and beverages within and among the food groups (including more dark-green vegetables, orange vegetables, legumes, fruits, whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products) and (2) limit foods with saturated fat, trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars, salt, and alcohol. Two tools can help you do that: MyPyra-mid from USDA and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan. Both focus on what to eat—and how much.

YOUR FOOD CHOICES – THE INSIDE STORY

FOR HEALTH WEIGHT MANAGEMENT IS ESSENTIAL

HEALTHFUL EATING, ACTIVE LIVING

This post contains the content of the book American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide3RD EDITION