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Subjunctive Mood Definition – Grammar

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Subjunctive

Subjunctive Mood

The subjunctive is used in some limited but important ways. It is used to express a demand, suggestion, or request (I suggest you be on time.); to express a wish (If only Jim were here.), or to set a condition for future action (We would leave if the storm would let up.). To understand these users, you need to examine the subjunctive conjugations. (Subjunctive Mood)

Verbs, Transitive Verbs, and Intransitive Verbs

The present tense subjunctive is formed from the infinitive of a verb minus the particle word to. Notice that each pronoun requires the identical verb form:

WHAT ARE NOUNS, PRONOUNS, AND PERSONAL PRONOUNS

Pronoun To be To go To have To work
I be go have work
You be go have work
He, She, It be go have work
We be go have work
They be go have work

The past tense subjunctive is formed from the plural past tense of either a regular or an irregular verb. Notice again that each pronoun requires the identical verb form:

AUXILIARY VERBS

Pronoun To be To go To have To work
I were went had worked
You were went had worked
He, She, It were went had worked
We were went had worked
They were went had worked

A third subjunctive conjugation is formed with the word would together with an infinitive, or would have plus a past participle. Look at these examples:

PASSIVE VOICE

Indicative Sentences                        Subjunctive Sentences
He is here. He would be here.
She buys a book. She would buy a book.
We have spoken. We would have spoken.
I have played. I would have played.

The present tense subjunctive is used to express a demand, suggestion, or request. In these instances, the subjunctive must be used in place of a regular present tense conjugation. Notice that it is optional to use the conjunction that. Consider these sentences: (Subjunctive Mood)

She demanded you be on time tomorrow. (not are)
She demanded that you be on time tomorrow.

I suggested he come by for a visit. (not comes)
I suggested that he come by for a visit.

The judge requested the lawyer have the documents prepared. (not has)
The judge requested that the lawyer have the documents prepared.

This same structure is used with a few other similar verbs: to command, to order, to propose. The past tense subjunctive is often used to express a wish:

I wish Ahmed were my brother.
She wished she had enough money for a car.
If only my mother worked for him, too.
The children wish it already were Christmas.

Note that a wish can be expressed by beginning a sentence with if or if only.

You should be aware that were is sometimes avoided in casual conversation and is frequently replaced by the simple past tense verb was with singular subjects (e.g., I wish Ahmed was my brother.).

The subjunctive formed with would is used when there are two clauses in a sentence and one of them is an if -clause. This kind of sentence sets a condition in one clause for the action to occur in the second clause. The past tense subjunctive is used in the if -clause. The word would appear in the clause that does not begin with if. Some examples:

If Nadia were here, Mother would be very happy.
If I had a million dollars, I would buy a big house.
She would travel to Spain if her uncle invited her.
Mr. Perez would learn English if he lived in Texas.

These sentences mean that the action would happen in the present or the future if the conditions were right.

This would happen if these conditions were right.
She would travel to Spain if her uncle invited her.

The same format is required even if the verbs are structured like the present perfect tense (I have gone, you have seen, etc.):

If Nadia had been here, Mother would have been very happy.
Mr. Perez would have learned English if he had lived in Texas.

These sentences mean that the action would have happened in the past if the conditions had been right.

This would have happened if these conditions had been right.
Mr. Perez would have learned English if he had lived in Texas.

This post contains the content of book English Grammar for ESL Learners  below is the link of complete book practice_makes_perfect__english_grammar_for_esl_learners 

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